THE CONSECRATED MAN

Charge them that are rich in this world, that they be not highminded, nor trust in uncertain riches, but in the living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy; That they do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to distribute, willing to communicate. (1 Timothy 6:17-18)

Every child of God is a consecrated man. His consecration is not typified by any outward symbol; we are not commanded to let our hair grow forever, nor to abstain from meats or drinks.

The Christian is a consecrated man, but his consecration is unseen by his fellows, excerpt in the outward deeds that are the result thereof. “But,” says someone, “can we be consecrated to Christ? I thought that was for ministers only.”

Oh no, my brethren, all God’s children must be consecrated men. What are you? Are you engaged in business? If you are what you profess to be, your business must be consecrated to God. Perhaps you have no family whatever and you are engaged in trade and are saving some considerable sum a year.

Let me tell you the example of a man thoroughly consecrated to God. There lives in Bristol a man whose income is large, and what does he do with it? He labors in business continually that this income may come to him.

But of it, every farthing every year is expended in the Lord’s cause except that which he requires for the necessities of life. He makes his necessities as few as possible, that he may have the more to give away. He is God’s man in business.

Brethren, you in business may be as much consecrated to Christ as the minister in his pulpit; you may make your ordinary transactions in life a solemn service of God.1

Charles Spurgeon

Further reading

Endnotes

  1. Charles SpurgeonAt the Master’s Feet [Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2005], July 16.