ELCA PASTRIX NADIA BOLZ-WEBER’S LATEST COMEDY STYLINGS NARCIGESIS

I first introduced you here at Apprising Ministries to Nadia Bolz-Weber who, prior to becoming an ELCA pastrix was“a professional f**k-up,“ in Christianity 21 And Alleged Innovative Voices In The Faith: Nadia Bolz-Weber.

Bolz-Weber, aka “Sarcastic Lutheran with the cranky spirituality of a postmodern gal,”1 would receive her ticket to the big leagues when she was called up to appear at the inaugural Christianity 21 apostasia-palooza in 2009:

Christianity21 is less a conference and more a happening, an event—a gathering of voices and ideas that will shape the future of our faith…

So we have gathered 21 of the most important voices for the future of Christianity—21 voices for the 21st century—to speak into our future as people of faith in this age. (source)

The “we” spoken of above is universalist Emerging Church pastor Doug Pagitt, and his friend Tony Jones, progressive “theologian in residence” at Solomon’s Porch—two thirds of the unholy EC trinity along with Living Spiritual Teacher and EC guru Brian McLaren.

You need to understand that with the feminist agenda growing now within conservative Christendom and pushing for women pastors Nadia Bolz-Weber is a real star on the rise; even outside of the apostate ELCA, and she’s currently infecting scores of younger evangelicals:

In the few years since ordination in late 2008, she has become famous within her denomination, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, and achieved international acclaim. She has a wide audience for her sermons and blogs, touted by the likes of progressive Christianity torch-bearer Jim Wallis.

ELCA Presiding Bishop Mark Hanson said Bolz-Weber’s influence extends far beyond Denver. “(Bolz-Weber) is highly regarded for her theological wisdom, her passion and creativity in proclaiming and embodying the Christian story across generational divides — and her free spirit,” Hanson said.

“She knows when to challenge us, how to encourage us, and yes, occasionally just leaves me shaking my head in wonder.” (source)

When she isn’t wowing Hanson or traveling and speaking Bolz-Weber is pastrix of the emerging House for All Sinners and Saints (HFASS, their abbreviation [get it?]) Lutheran church, affiliated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America, and consisting of:

a group of folks figuring out how to be a liturgical, Christo-centric, social justice oriented, queer inclusive, incarnational, contemplative, irreverent, ancient – future church with a progressive but deeply rooted theological imagination. (Online source)

As you can see, we’re not dealing with an actual pastor or church; nor is the ELCA a Christian denomination. Earlier today Bolz-Weber tweeted something she wanted us to know:


(source)

The video comes from ELCA Gathering You Tube channel, so following is what the ELCA itself proudly wanted us to know about pastrix Bolz-Weber:

Rev. Nadia is the founding pastor of House for All Sinners and Saints in Denver, Colorado. She is the author of “Salvation on the Small Screen? 24 Hours of Christian Television” (Seabury 2008) and blogs at www.sarcasticlutheran.com and Jim Wallis’ www.Godspolitics.com.

Her writings can be found in the Christian Century, The Lutheran magazine and Patheos.com. Nobody really believes she’s an ordained pastor in the ELCA. Maybe it’s the sleeve tattoos or the fact that she swears like a truck driver. Either way…she’s fine with it. (source)

So much for any actual attempt by Bolz-Weber to even remotely try and live up to the qualifications of an elder (cf. 1Timothy 3:1-7). What she’s pointing us to is the 2012 ELCA Youth Gathering, which is wrapping up today:


(source)

Bolz-Weber warped the youth there this past Wednesday, which you’ll see below. Her Emerging Church mythology begins with her first praising herself for how she doesn’t look like a Lutheran pastor. Little wonder, she isn’t really one anyway. Bolz-Weber is dreaming if she thinks Martin Luther would have women pastors.

For more on that, I refer to the interested reader to Martin Luther Says No…To Women Pastors. She then describes her first exposure to what professed to be Christianity. Bolz-Weber explains that she isn’t going to tell us what church it was. However, she has revealed it before; actually it was the cult-like Church of Christ.2

She laments that women couldn’t be pastors within the CoC; but that is actually in line with what God’s Word says (cf. 1 Timothy 2:12). Bolz-Weber goes on to describe how the unChristian legalism in that denomination drove her away from Christianity. Here we need to stop and meditate upon a couple of things.

First of all, we empathize that Nadia Bolz-Weber was exposed to what really isn’t an expression of the genuine Christian faith. Secondly, this story is virtually identical to what you’ll hear in the testimonies of Emergent Church luminaries. It’s a legitimate grievance; however, their solution is to swing to the opposite extreme.

In a message that sounds like something you’d hear at a meeting of some 12 step or group counseling program Bolz-Weber then tells us more about her rebellion and descent into sin. At 5:13 in she says she believes God rudely interrupted her life and changed her direction. Of course, this is possible, but He didn’t call her as a pastrix.

At this point in her onstage routine at the ELCA Youth Gathering she moves close to mentioning the Gospel as she attributes that redirection as God’s grace. Unfortunately, Bolz-Weber misses the opportunity and instead moves on to talk about meeting “her husband. Matthew Weber is also a Lutheran pastor, but of a more mainline stripe.”3

So you can see, both pastrix Bolz-Weber and pastor Weber are progressive/liberals. From there Bolz-Weber shifts into discussing what is essentially the social gospel 2.0 the Emerging Church refers to as Emergence Christianity. However, as she shares how she “tired to be a Unitarian” she heads toward the Gospel once again.

Bolz-Weber tells us how she thought Unitarians have “this high opinion of humanity” which she couldn’t believe because, like all of us, her heart is “kinda dark.” But once again, Bolz-Weber can’t keep the ball on the court and hits it out of bounds missing the chance to discuss how this darkness of sin separates the unregenerate from God.

Instead she focuses on the liturgy within Lutheranism and how it spoke to her. The problem is, she’s not anywhere near in line with what Martin Luther taught. Even so though, as Bolz-Weber continues her stand up routine she heads in the direction of the Gospel telling us what she learned in her Lutheran confirmation class.

Bolz-Weber talks about the grace of God once again but without any mention of repentance and forgiveness of sins in Jesus’ Name. While she does point out that human beings aren’t continually “self-improving,” instead of sin and repentance we get the progressive/liberal metaphor “that God comes to us” and keeps making “us new.”

This she says is “death and resurrection.” Rather than telling the many youth there, which in the ELCA we’d assume are largely unbelievers, that the reason God makes someone new is because salvation is by God’s grace alone, through faith alone, in the finished work of Christ alone of the Cross, she praises its apostate Lutheranism.

While well-meaning I’m sure, from there it’s a quick trip down into Bolz-Weber’s own apostasy and gathering of lost souls at HFASS she’s been convincing are Christians. Make no mistake, she says at 15:14 that “people like myself are hearing the Gospel of Jesus Christ,” but the rotten fruit reveals it’s another gospel, which is no gospel.

Finally, we do have to agree when Nadia Bolz-Weber says, “I should not be allowed to talk to you.” She is a willful rebel against the Word of God who has no business whatsoever being considered as a sister in Christ until she repents of it; and of her false doctrine and preaching a non-gospel which only leaves people dead in their sins.

Oddly enough, for all her hipster persona, Nadia Bolz-Weber ends with a Joel Osteen-like ELCA pep rally…

Further reading

Endnotes

  1. http://www.patheos.com/blogs/nadiabolzweber/2011/12/sermon-on-mary/, accessed 7/22/12.
  2. Ibid.
  3. http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_17912633, accessed 7/22/12.